ARFID 101

Earlier today, I was honored to present a webinar on Avoidant-Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) for Families Empowered and Supporting Treatment for Eating Disorders (FEAST).

AFRID is a relatively new diagnostic category which was first added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Volume 5 (DSM-5) in 2013. ARFID is characterized by a pattern of avoidant or restrictive eating behaviors which led to significant nutritional, medical, developmental, and/or social-emotional consequences. Individuals with ARFID may restrict their food intake for a variety of reasons. Some individuals are hypersensitive to textures, tastes, and smells and feel comfortable with only a narrow variety of foods. Others don’t experience hunger cues, derive little pleasure or enjoyment from eating, and seem to have little interest in food. Still others begin restricting their food intake abruptly after a food-related trauma, such as choking, vomiting, or having an allergic reaction. Unlike those with Anorexia Nervosa or Bulimia Nervosa, patients with ARFID do not experience drive for thinness, fear of weight gain, or distorted body image.

Treatments for ARFID include Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Family-Based Treatment (FBT).

My PowerPoint slides from the presentation are available below. The recorded webinar will be available on the FEAST website within the next few days.

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